May 24th, 2012
04:31 PM ET

Should Formula One be so unpredictable?

Sebastian Vettel's fans have had only one race win to celebrate this year ahead of the Monaco GP. (Getty Images)
Sebastian Vettel's fans have had only one race win to celebrate this year ahead of the Monaco GP. (Getty Images)

(Editor's note: Ed Foster is the associate editor of Motor Sport magazine. He is also an F1 pundit for CNN's World Sport show.)

Five winners from the first five races? What’s happened to Formula One? We’re used to seeing a young German dominate, but he’s only won one race this year.

It has happened before, but it's very rare. In fact you have to go back to 1983, when five drivers from five different teams won the first five races.

Alain Prost broke that streak at Spa in Belgium, with his second victory of the season, but almost 30 years later there is no guarantee that the 2012 trend will not continue this weekend in Monaco. FULL POST

May 11th, 2012
12:02 PM ET

Can Ferrari fight back in F1 title race?

Ferrari's Fernando Alonso hopes for more improvements in Barcelona. (Getty Images)
Ferrari's Fernando Alonso hopes for more improvements in Barcelona. (Getty Images)

(Editor's note: Ed Foster is the associate editor of Motor Sport magazine. He is also an F1 pundit for CNN's World Sport show.)

As the Formula One circus makes its way to Catalunya for the first of the European rounds this weekend, Ferrari finds itself hoping, desperately, that it has made a step forward.

The teams have just finished their first in-season test since 2008, and after three days spent at Mugello everyone has their eyes on the Italian cars. Can Ferrari turn its season around with just one test? Probably not, is the quick answer.

Between the beginning of 2000 and the end of 2004, Ferrari was utterly dominant in Formula One. So dominant, in fact, that thanks to its drivers Michael Schumacher and Rubens Barrichello it notched up 57 wins in 85 races (48 of which were courtesy of Germany's seven-time world champion). FULL POST

April 20th, 2012
07:21 PM ET

How are Formula One's elite faring in the battle for supremacy?

Sebastian Vettel with his familiar No.1 pose from his all-conquering 2011 season.
Sebastian Vettel with his familiar No.1 pose from his all-conquering 2011 season.

(Editor's note: Ed Foster is the associate editor of Motor Sport magazine. He is also an F1 pundit for CNN's World Sport show.)

Why hasn't Red Bull won a race so far this year? What's happened to Sebastian Vettel and Mark Webber? Last year the German driver turned up at every track expecting to win, such was the dominance of his car. However, this year it's all changed.

Mercedes has won its first race since 1955, McLaren has started the year with a quick car, and Ferrari most certainly hasn't. Is Red Bull's dominance finally over? It is for now, but don't expect double world champion Vettel to be happy not taking that checkered flag and showing us all that "victory finger" of his.

For those that are wondering what's happened since the black and white flag was waved in Brazil last season, here's some insight from the paddock:

FULL POST

March 16th, 2012
07:57 PM ET

Vettel still the man to beat in year of the champions

Sebastian Vettel is the center of media attention ahead of the opening grand prix of the season in Australia.
Sebastian Vettel is the center of media attention ahead of the opening grand prix of the season in Australia.

The fact that there are six Formula One world champions on the grid for this weekend’s season-opening Australian Grand Prix, the most there has ever been, is amazing.

As racing drivers, what they all want to do is win a race with the best possible grid. If they win against nobodies, it means nothing to them. But with six world champions, if they win a race, it is a huge accolade to have.

One of the reasons it should be a really good season is all the teams seem much closer together this year. We won’t know the true nature of things until the end of the fly away races at the beginning of the season, but everything looks a bit closer. Even the midfield teams look closer to the front of the grid than normal. FULL POST